Citrus Trees in Seattle  

 

You can enjoy the wonderful fragrance and luxury of growing citrus trees and harvesting fresh citrus fruit in Seattle, but it does require a couple of conditions: Citrus trees need a sunny spot, and they will require protection from the coldest months of the year – typically late November through March.

Meyer Lemon Tree
A favorite of gourmets. Its soft skin develops an orange hue when fruit is fully ripe, and its distinctive flavor combines lemon with a hint of tangerine. It is easy to grow, compact, and notoriously prolific in its blooming and fruiting. Can flower twice a year, such that both fruit and flowers can be present all year long.
Key Lime
Mexican (Key) Lime trees have very tropical flavored fruit on a small plant. Good for fitting into smaller spaces.
Bearrs or Persian Lime
Known as Bearss lime, Tahitian lime, and Persian lime. This nearly-thornless trees can grow to a medium-large size with a spreading form with white blossoms. More cold-hardy than Mexican lime trees, they can do well in our area if protected from the cold.
Thai Lime
The zest and juice of the bumpy Thai Lime are used in Thai, Cambodian, and Indonesian cooking. (Also known as Kieffir Lime).
Kumquat
The Variegated Centennial Kumquat is a form of the Nagami Kumquat. These trees are finely branched and very ornamental. The Centennial kumquat has variegated pale yellow and cream leaves and variegated fruit until they ripen into large orange fruit.
Yuzu Tree
Yuzu trees are cold hardy (known to survive temperatures as low as 10º F). They grow wild in Tibet and Central China, yet have been most appreciated as a cultivated tree in Japan and Korea. The zest and juice are essential ingredients in Ponzu sauce and an important component in some miso soup recipes.
Satsuma Mandarin Tree
The Owari Satsuma Mandarin Orange is the hardiest of all the mandarins. Fruit ripens in November or December and is seedless and easy to peel.
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Meyer Lemon Tree

A favorite of gourmets. Its soft skin develops an orange hue when fruit is fully ripe, and its distinctive flavor combines lemon with a hint of tangerine. It is easy to grow, compact, and prolific in its blooming and fruiting. Meyer lemon trees can flower twice a year, such that both fruit and flowers can be present all year long.

Key Lime Tree

Mexican (Key) Lime trees have very tropical flavored fruit on a small plant. Excellent choice for smaller spaces or in containers. Fruits are small, almost round and the leaves are fragrant when crushed. Mexican limes are also know as Bartender’s lime and West Indian lime and are the lime of choice for pie makers! 

Bearrs Lime

Known as Bearss lime, Tahitian lime, and Persian lime. This nearly-thornless trees can grow to a medium-large size with a spreading form with white blossoms. More cold-hardy than Mexican lime trees, they can do well in our area if protected from the cold.

Thai Lime

The zest and juice of the bumpy Thai Lime are used in Thai, Cambodian, and Indonesian cooking - the leaves being the most frequently used part of the plant, fresh or dried. Thai limes are small and turn yellow when ripe. (Also known as Kieffir Lime). 

Kumquat

The Variegated Centennial Kumquat is a form of the Nagami Kumquat. These trees are finely branched and very ornamental. The Centennial Kumquat has variegated pale yellow and cream leaves and variegated fruit until they ripen into large orange fruit. The trees are thornless. Kumquats are self pollinating as are most citrus. 

Yuzu Tree

Yuzu trees are cold hardy (known to survive temperatures as low as 10º F). They grow wild in Tibet and Central China, yet have been most appreciated as a cultivated tree in Japan and Korea. The zest and juice are essential ingredients in Ponzu sauce and an important component in some miso soup recipes.

Satsuma Mandarin

The Owari Satsuma Mandarin Orange is the hardiest of all the mandarins. Fruit ripens in November or December and is seedless and easy to peel. 

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